About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNNW 25
MSNBCW 23
CSPAN 14
CSPAN2 12
CNBC 6
FBC 4
KNTV (NBC) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 122
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the nuclear energy sector, not only do nuclear power plants provide affordable, reliable and clean energy, they also provide many quality high-paying jobs and are the backbone of many communities. my district is shome to a nuclear plant -- is home to a nuclear plant that employs near 700 people. nuclear energy is a secure energy source that plays a vital role in a responsible, all-of-the-above energy policy. mr. davis: it is the biggest provider of reliable, efficient, clean energy and it provides on-demand energy 24/7. the recent record cold temperatures in the midwest show the importance of energy diversification. many of my constituents saw steep increases in their electric bill. while pipes froze and transportation became difficult because of iced roads and bridges, nuclear power remained consistent. i worry that things could have become worse if nuclear power wasn't able to fill the gaps where needed. this is why i stand here today in support of nuclear energy and all of my constituents and the hardworkin
impact for ukraine. peter cook tells us how the ukraine is fueling the energy debate here in the states. ukraine. the latest on president obama says russian president vladimir putin has breached international law. the present spoke to reporters earlier today on the situation in crimea. thatere is a strong belief russia's actions is violating international law. president putin seems to think -- has a different set of lawyers making a different set of interpretations. that is fooling anybody. everybody recognizes that, although russia has legitimate interests in what happens in a neighboring state, that does not give them the right to use force as a means of inserting influence. said heresident also has not spoken to president putin since the weekend. let's get the latest on the --und rumble bloomberg ground from bloomberg. what is the latest in the standoff? much a tensel very standoff. there's is an air base down in crimea. it was taken over by russian forces over the weekend. this morning, ukrainian troops -- 300 of them -- marched back to that base and said they wanted it back. soldie
. his funds blew away the market last year. you done want to miss hpicks. >>> the energy departmentç approving loan guarantees for first new nuclear power plant in years. christine todd whitman tells us whether this is the beginning of a nuclear resurgence in this country. >> and chipotle trying to walk back comments that rising costs associated with climate change could eventually force the company to take guacamole or salsa off the menu. we have a stock brawl coming up. you're watching cnbc, first in business worldwide. for tapping into a wealth of experience. ♪ for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. ♪ for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. make it happen with fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. call or click to open your fidelity account today. >>> welcome back. the recent spike in energy p
stock for 10-plus years, other than the energy sector, and that is where we thought the lifting of all of that public policy and certainty related to all of the government issues we have had the last two years, that would be the main driver and that durable a much more placed to pick consumer oriented companies. indexdid see the pricing today -- it went up a point more than people thought, giving some hope it would rebound a little bit. but guess what? the r&d taxon of credits last year. congress did not renew those. we are seeing bid increases -- big increases in november and december. we have seen nothing in february so far. what we do not know is whether we will see that building and, whether there was a temporal, prime shift with black -- prime shift -- >> you think that is inevitable? >> the good part of the durable goods report last month, or last week showed a big pickup in january. we had in industrials conference. we got a lot of positive .necdotes from these companies they are much more interested in capital spending or even nurtures and acquisitions than vying back stocks. i
of the leverage that president putin does have. partly, he has the energy, which flows underneath ukraine and supplies so much of europe. and more than that, he has now threatened, we are told, to no longer use the united states dollar as a currency on the world market. what if he did that? maria bartiromo from the fox business network will join us next to talk about the ramifications of such a thing. whether he could do it and what it would mean to our economy. would it, as the russians say, cripple our economy? that's next. t! [bell rings] this...is jane. her long day on set starts with shoulder pain... ...and a choice take 6 tylenol in a day which is 2 aleve for... ...all day relief. hmm. [bell ring] "roll sound!" "action!" [ chainsaw whirring ] humans -- sometimes liferips us up. sometimes we trip ourselveup. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... [ thump ] to speak with an insurance
that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said for that. as you know i'm more of a clean energy guy but taking that away from russia, their monopoly in energy, is good. but republicans are missing an opportunity to look more bipartisan. >> congressman engel, i think what bothers republicans is how much the president and the administration seems to have empowered putin over the past few years. just to give you a couple of examples. russia controls the northern distribution network which is one of the main access points in afghanistan that our troops rely on to get supplies and food and water. putin controls that. putin is controlling our syria chemical weapons collection deal, which is a farce. putin is undermining our negotiations in iran. have we given him too much power? why ha
to happen. but at the end of the day, the only options we have are to increase our own energy independence, put energy in a position where putin doesn't have access to the energy reserves and to the reknew that's he's had in the past. so whether this president does it or the next president does it, somebody has to do it. and i keep going back, shannon, you know, we survived jimmy carter, we're going to survive barack obama, but it will be incumbent on the next president to stop president obama. otherwise, neither will stop president putin. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> thank you, shannon. >>> the top democrat in the senate says the obamacare horror stories are live. that has some experiencing them first hand pretty fired up. >> i'm completely outraged. it's absolutely ridiculous. >> we're going debate the issue fair and balanced, of course, next. >>> another snowstorm spreading across the country gearing up to hit the east coast tonight. whether you want them or not, you need to know. [ female announcer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made
's parliament, kerry promised a billion dollar loan guarantee designed to ease the sting of energy costs. officials traveling with kerry had voiced concern that russian president vladimir putin who last week sent tens of thousands of forces may be preparing for a larger invasion of eastern ukraine. putin himself looking relaxed at a state res dnls outside moscow held a rare news conference in which he suggested any such broader invasion would be a last resort but well within russia's right because they have received approval by yanukovych. >> even if i take a decision to use armed force, it would be legitimate, in the norms of international law, and in this case, it would also correspondent to our interest in protecting the people who are closely tied to us historically, culturally, economically. >> kerry has emphasized the u.s. wants to de-escalate the crisis, responding to putin's comments. >> he really denied there were troops in crimea? >> yes, he did. >> i have spoken directly to president putin today as i can. it is not appropriate to invade a country and at the end of a barrel of
are under way. they can develop alternative energy supplies, including fracking. including as the united states becomes an energy exporter, there are alternative sources there in the future and sources -- the inauguration of of the new pipeline project from the caspian sea which will be a new route for gas supplies into europe, not passing through russia, not from russia. this infrastructure will take time to develop but it is important to do so. the world is becoming increasingly unstable. this latest example to world peace is the classic case in my view. will the foreign secretary array with me -- agree with me that our country must rethink the funding of our armed forces to make sure we have the ships, the navy, the air force to me potential threats in the future. i am not hinting we should go to war on this case but it is a reminder we need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defen
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
forward an energy plan that shows how we can move out of this. i fault them as well. no government has been willing to stand up to these powerful interests. and that's why people are confus confused. many people, most people in america know climate is changing, most of those who say that know that it's human caused. i think that most of the debate is about the science is a pseudodebate. what we don't have is a real debate about how to change the energy system right now. >> but let me ask you on that, note, bill. because the president, i mean, first of all, it's not just america. we need an international quorum for action. >> that's correct. >> 7 of the 200-plus countries account for -- china is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases. india is right up there. they have not been particularly forward leaning on this issue in terms of gathering international action on it. so what -- internationally what should be done to increase, i think, the sort of buy-in, if you will from other countries and then i want to ask you as a follow-up after you answer that, how do you grade the president's
, the reality is that russia has a lot of nuclear weapons. their economy is modest except for energy, and they're not a great power, but they have the ability to pick them off one at a time. their neighbors abroad, they can do that, they went into georgia as you'll recall. ukraine is enormously important to the world. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of g
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
, pointing out that russia is germany's biggest supplier of energy. we know that merkel spoke with our president last night. she spoke with putin several times since the crisis started. could she be a key player in potentially resolving this situation? >> yes. absolutely. i mean, germany, after all, is the most important military and economic power in europe. the problem here, as you rightfully point out, is that most of germany's natural gas supplies run through that natural gas pipelines through ukraine, from russia, to germany. she's already signaled that she's not in favor of imposing economic sanctions on russia. well, if she's not in favor of supporting economic sanctions on -- on russia as well as denying russia a space in the g-8 and turning that into the g-7, it sort of defangs the capacity of the united states to act forcefully with putin if he decides that, well, what -- what matters to him if he moves his forces into eastern ukraine. who's going to stop him. >> yeah, and josh, i also want to touch on the energy and economics issues which are important here. >> yeah. >> a lo
exports travel through the pipelines that go through ukraine, so how is energy factoring in this equation? >> it's vital. we're being aggressive because we don't depend on russian energy, where as the germans, this is a big debate. maybe this is a positive thing that the russians depend on a trade with europe and why putin's backing off now, or does it make the europeans dependent on russia? >> it's fot really an option for russia to stop the exports. that would be self defeating economically. >> true, but we were talking earlier, on monday the russian stock market lost $70 billion, at the same time, vladimir putin spent $50 billion on the sochi olympics, so i think it's the economic costs making it pause now. >> at some point it's got to have enough of an impact on the russian economy that he's sitting up and taking notice. >> yes, that's why the u.s. is pushing harder for economic sanctions. i think the economic issues make him pause. he's unlikely to push further into ukraine with his troops, but if he feels he's going to lose his warm water port in crimea, which this is all about, he
the effects of reduced energy subsidies from russia. that's why ukrainians have been getting oil and gas and been able to do it cheaply. now that they want to rebuild the economy, they need to work with the imf on this. one of the things the imf is looking for them to do is raise energy prices. a lot is geared toward the energy factor. u.s. is sending technical advisors to work with the government on energy reforms and other types of financial reforms that they need to do to rebuild the economy. they also want to help the ukrainian businesses. they're talking about further assistance. they'll be sending advisors to work on anticorruption and recovering. is it enough? don't know. the ukrainians said they need $30 billion to rebuild the economy. this is a drop in the bucket. >> obviously the administration has been trying to motivate and rally members of the european union to join them in threatening at the at least sanctions and of punishments against the russian government and individuals in the russian government perhaps. i'm wondering what you've heard about the difficulties the u.s. h
,hose particularly energy. this has been about for the russian economy. the currency has fallen. the stock market is down. there was a reaction to this that may affect putin's economy. but i mention one other thing? is this beautiful and large country called ukraine. suppose ukraine finally after failing in 2004 get it right -- democracy, gets rid of corruption, the economy is improving, and it is there of the border for russia. i think it makes him nervous if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia. if the sanctions fail? what do you do it the pressure with his he continues own ambitious ideas of expanding within his own borders and spears of influence? >> go back to georgia in nato. if you tried something like that ay with one area that has significant russian popularity -- population, he would be attacking nato. that would be an entirely different set of circumstances. i have no illusions that in the short term, we will be able to ambitions.tin's in the long term, we can curb those ambitions in many ways, b
significant things in that the military intervention threatens to derail energy under vegan. -- intervention. the key pipelines that go from russia into europe through ukraine. we have seen energy analysts saying that it could affect gas prices as far away as great britain. >> and not to mention supply routes as well for troops in afghanistan. how is it then that vladimir putin feels he has the upper hand, that the international community is impotent? >> i think there is very little militarily that the international community can do. when the kremlin has sent troops across the border in the past of the u.s. and its allies cried foul before. we saw this in 1979, we find thousand eight -- we saw in 2008, but no military action was taken. it is not clear they will go further than seizing crimea, but there is very little beyond diplomatic and economic isolation that the rest of the world can do at this point. it remains to be seen how the ripple effects are going to affect the economy, and also diplomatic ties with russia which we need for other reasons like iran and syria. indira joining us on
the energy situation. thank god, the weather is going to get warmer soon. he has those levers. he has an overwhelming military capability. there are many, many things, but particularly energy. but, you know, this has been bad for the russian economy. the value of their currency has fallen, the stock market is down. there is a negative reaction to this, too, that may effect putin's economy. and could i mention one other aspect of this is putin also sees -- here's this beautiful and large and magnificent country called ukraine. suppose ukraine, finally, after failing in 2004, gets it right, democracy, gets rid of corruption, economy is improving, and it's right there on the border of russia. so i think it makes him very nervous, if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia, as you know, which is propped up by energy. >> charlie: should we revisit the question of georgia and nato? >> yes. i really believe that we should sponsor the inclusion of georgia into nato. every few weeks the russians move the fe
different ways. obviously rising gas prices along with energy prices on the rise in general. already trading near the highs of the year, partly on concerns about supply disruptions with russia and ukraine. higher grain prices as well or even food prices. ukraine, remember, is a major exporter of wheat and corn. if you pair that with some of the weather issues we have been having, you could see higher sticker prices for your food. then there are american companies with direct exposure to ukraine, like accounting firm pwc. we reached out to them. they came back to us. they actually had to close offices in two different locations. they said although they were briefly closed all of pwc's offices in the ukraine are now open. there are other american companies that we found with business in ukraine. cargill, abbott labs, both no comment. adm, no significant business impact but it's monitoring. baker mckenzie, the first international law firm to open its doors in ukraine in the early '90s, they told me they are keeping an eye on this situation under constant review and employees there are allowed t
for natural gas and energy from russia to europe. when you look at the region you can see that half of russian exports are to the european union. this is all-important. those are the major pipelines we're looking tlat. in terms of stocks you're not seeing the big dramatic impact at the opening bell that we thought. at worse you had dow futures down 160 points now down about 100. here's the conventional wisdom. russian stock market got slammed. the russian currency slammed. russian businessmen outraged, very concerned about what's going to happen to their economy. now you hear people saying that maybe, just maybe those russian markets are going to be a very powerful diplomat and temper some of the saber rattling we've been seeing, that big reaction in russian markets means perhaps the worst is behind us because why in the world would anybody try to do anything to make markets continue to be unstable there. that's the thinking right now. dow is down about 100 points. >> only two minutes in and more than 100 points. let's bring in our global economic analyst. what's your take. why this quick coll
some energy, but to turn that into money might be seven to ten years' window. but what's important about phase one if you have major oil players from the u.s. and russia and europe and china engaged in the sector, in the eastern mediterranean alongside israel and cyprus which relates to then turkey and the e.u. and all of that, it might create for lebanon an investment in its stability and its long-term viability because of the importance of energy. similar to what, how the gulf sort of gets its stability and security. the gulf countries are, you know, strange tribes, but they survived because they have important resources. other parking lots of the world -- parts of the world sometimes have that as well. that's very important for lebanon's geostrategic environment. if the east and west agree that this must be a peace offul zone because there are important resources here, now actually moving forward on what's the economic value of this, the first thing is to figure out how to get it to market. the market is effectively europe. the original approach was or the plan was certainly to
,000,000,000 in energy subsidies to the ukraine because those subsidies are likely to be taken away because of an imf package. there is a real fear of what an imf loan package means, a structural adjustment package, huge cuts to the poorest in society to the sort we saw in greece and elsewhere, future unrest and the u.s. is quite a wear that when countries go down the road of imf loans, you can get even more unrest. another interesting thing about that energy subsidy is a lot of that money is going to end up in moscow because it's moscow who sells much of ukraine its fuel. in washington, they are quite a wear they are giving potentially a billion dollars to moscow. >> just how far is the u.s. supposed to go in supporting ukraine? at what point is it going to run up against opposition in congress? >> there is a lot of -- a lot of support for financial aid and financial loans to ukraine. however, the senate majority leader, harry reid said let's keep an idea on what europe wants. this is mainly a european issue. if europe isn't all for sanctions -- and they are not because they are scared of losing al
to help offset expected increases in energy costs coming from russia, as russia continues to try to squeeze them. there's a lot of interest in his reaction to what vladimir putin said. he would have gotten a readout by now, but has been on a pretty busy schedule, the emotional trip through the square, where he lit a candle and visited the shrine to those who fell to snipers' bullets, so he didn't see it himself, we were on the plane overnight flying when putin was speaking, but contrary to all of the u.s. pressure for him to take the off-ramp and exit -- >> we've, obviously, lost our connection to andrea mitchell, but, of course, we'll have the very latest information she brings to us, again, in about 15 minutes, we will hear from secretary kerry. meanwhile, let me bring in nbc's ian williams, also in the ukrainian capital of kiev and what's happening on the ground there, in particular the crimea region. ian, what is the latest you are seeing? >> reporter: hi, tamron. well, just to pick up from what andrea was saying, it's going to be interesting to see what kerry has to say, how
program and washington said it should be allowed to produce energy. mr. obama will hold a similar meeting with the president in two weeks. orthodox jews were in west jerusalem over the weekend. they were protesting a law being debated in the israeli parliament with men to be drafted into military service and orthodox jews have been exempt and they want to keep it that way. >> it's important to tell the state of isreal that we are opposed to their political philosophies that we feel that the contribution that the elements of society are making will help the army and through our contributions and the religious spectrum we are arm and arm with the army, helping the state of israel. >> reporter: the new legislation is expected to pass in the next few weeks. ultra orthodox jews makeup 10% of israel's population. a california state lawmaker facing corruption charges says he is taking a paid leave of absence and he is accused of accepting about 100,000 in bribes including meals and golf games in exchange for his political influence. he is pleading not guilty. and he is the second california sta
that all he is interested in is domestic energy for peaceful purposes. the problem is that's not what's happening. what's happening is that the united states, through the state department and this administration, i think de facto has already but if not are on the verge of agreeing to allow iran to keep in place its enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, and i'm going to explain to you why that's a problem. if that capability is still there, if they retain all the facilities necessary for enrichment and reprocessing, even if they agree to limit to to a certain level for now at any point in time in the future they can ratchet it back up and they can go on to develop a weapon. in fact, the design for a weapon is the easiest part unfortunately of all of this. the hardest part is reaching the technological capability to enrich uranium to a certain point so you can weaponize it. if you allow them to keep all the equipment, all the technology, all the scientists, all that infrastructure in place, then at any point in the future when they decide now it's time for a weapon, they can break o
have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a military nuclear program. i said it here once. i will say it here again. if it looks like a duck, if it walks like a duck, if it quacks like a duck, then what is it? well, it ain't a chicken. and it certainly not a dove. it is still a nuclear duck. [applause] unfortunatelily the leading powers of the world are talking about leading iran with the capability to enrich uranium. i hope they don't do that because that would be a grave error. it would leave iran as a threshold nuclear power. it would enable iran to rapidly develop nuclear weapons, at a time when the world's attention is focused elsewhere. and we see, as we speak, that that could happen. in one part of the world today, tomorrow in another part, may
ago where i felt, actually, all the energy was in the commercial sector and the dynamism and the independence, of course, was in the commercial sector. but rta does reach across the whole country. it does reach into the rural areas. it does reach outside of the city. it does reach those populations who are not reached by the commercial media. and i think all media is important, but rta is absolutely key to the future of a country. particularly if it can become more independent. what, as we were talking about this morning, is needed in afghanistan is a national dialogue, is a national public debate. and i think one of the foundation stones for the national dialogue to come is something like, is rta. this is a difficult argument to make, actually. i mean, we support public service broadcasting around the world, and the number of success stories, successful transition of state characters to independent, financially-independent public broadcasters is not a big one. the political price of surrendering control of your state broadcaster by any incumbent president is very, very h
of the interagency task forces that they were on. and so the secretary of energy asked me to do that project in the department of energy, and the department of energy was on, like, 133 task forces that either the secretary, the deputy secretary or an undersecretary had to participate in and had meetings at least once a month or once a week or whatever. so i sent around a questionnaire to all the assistant secretaries and said how many of these task forces do you think we could eliminate? and what do you think the answer was? [laughter] none. even though some of them never went to 'em, some of them never met. when they, when push came to shove, and this was in the reagan administration, they didn't want to give it up because at some point in tomb in some future -- in time in some future there might be an interagency task force that helped department of energy. i think if we checked with the federal agencies, they would all tell us they not only couldn't give back any spectrum, they probably needed more. but if we had a market an lust come in and do an outside independent audit, w
enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ with the stunts and loud explosions and all the muscles. [ as cosby ] i want to see the comedy programming with the children. [ british accent] watch bravo! yeah, i want to see "the real housewives." rewind! yeah! jimmy? it's been hours. we told you the x1 entertainment operating system show me "the tonight show starring jimmy fallon." that's what i'm talking about right there. [ cheers and applause ] [ female anno
is announcing a $1 billion energy subsidy package. moscow amid worries that was ready to stretch its military rich further into the mainland. your reaction? guest: is a good sign the tangible support. it is important to remember that the united states along with russia and great written in 1994 -- in great britain in 1994 made certain assurances to the ukraine, and russia is now in violation. they need to respond to support ukraine and look for ways to in allies russia until they cease military action. host: president vladimir putin back, but saides that russia reserves the right to protect russians in the country and he accused the u.s. of encouraging an unconstitutional he hopes russia will not need to use force in predominantly russian-speaking eastern ukraine . guest: there is a certain irony there. first of all, president vladimir fled.ch when the agreement was signed, the russian representative refused to witness it. .here is a certain irony it has not been carried out because viktor yanukovych fled to russia. host: let's start with mario in connecticut on the line for democrats. good m
. but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor
objectives affected by energy issues. while the national debate is over, tubes and mobile biological weapons labs, internal documents note that increased oil production in a post war iraq would have the vul effect of reducing world oil prices. >> prior to our even going to war in iraq, the focus was on oil. and iraqi oil and how to take it over far more than anything else. >> joining me now is rachel maddow, the host of the "the rachel maddow" show and "why we did it." what is the answer after all of your work on this? >> i think, andrea, the question is the most important part, which is the decisions of our generation on national security are determined more than anything by what the george w. bush administration did with that nine-year war in iraq and alongside of the 13-year war in afghanistan that's still going on. the american people are against those wars. those are the determine tif constraint for thinking about everything from crimea to syria to what the overall size of the u.s. military is. if we want avoid those protracted foreign -- we can't make good decisions until we understand
energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor about a
-- of its energy from russia, from russian natural gas. sometimes it goes even higher than that. so they are going to be very reluctant to do the kind of comprehensive sanctions which would deprive them of that energy. and as you point out, london's role as a financial center is dependent upon other things, russia's capital. i think we should push for as comprehensive sanctions as we can get. you're never going to get totally comprehensive sanctions, but they do exact a price. and what we're trying to do here, as i see it, what the united states is trying to do with many members of the international community, make russia pay some price, some significant price, isolate it, and send a signal that this is not how we want business to be conducted in the 21 s century. you're not going to be able to stop it in its tracks. you're not going to be able to send troops into crimea. but the fact that we can't get 100% leak proof sanctions doesn't mean we shouldn't try to raise the bar and exact some price. >> i would like you to listen, fareed, to what the secretary of state, john kerry, said
to the broader climate action plan and the energy initiatives in the president's budget? >> the overall effort, the climate action plan deals with the range of energy policies, things like investments in clean energy, things like moving on greenhouse gas emissions, and also dealing with resilience and making sure we are being a good partner to state and local governments as they prepare for the impacts of climate change. this is a piece of that. significant investment. again as i mentioned both through fema, to help state and local and tribal governments prepare, but also to include research data unlocking information that will be helpful in that process. and also building on our experience after superstorm sandy to make sure that we are investing in the right kinds of technologies. so there are multiple pieces of that. we consider it part of the verall target tax plan agenda. >> the ryan-murray deal for 2014 ows 10, 12 discretionier spending, but your wugget shows 10-33 in base discretionary spending. can you explain that discrepancy? >> we built the budget and built it to the basic 10-14, th
on the gaspron export account with his for gazprom, the giant energy company majority controlled by the russian government. they were working both those accounts and setting up both. that's how it works in washington. >> are they all american citizens? >> they are, as far as i can tell. we called all of these firms for comments. none would call us back except for maslansky, who said they didn't see anything wrong working for the russians. we didn't have a chance to ask key questions like that, but looking at the bios on a lot of these web sites, it does appear that the majority of them are american citizens. >> if they're not, we can throw them out. this leads to another point i made at the top of the show. people coming in from russia or wherever, and i'm especially thinking about the oligarchs, who like to travel freely, there's the act that allows personal sanctions or revoke visas. basically either throw foreigners out or not let them in. the president has the authority. that bill was passed just a couple years ago. now it could be a powerful weapon. >> what is interesting here is the forei
in washington this week, gives the members of the caucus renewed energy and purpose. events held during rare disease week highlight what has been accomplished and what still needs to be done and there is a lot to do but we will do it together. i am working on important legislation in this area, the bipartisan modernizing our drug and diagnostic evaluation and regulatory network, or modern cures act, that will update the nation's drug evaluation process to encourage the discovery and development of new treatments for chronic and rare diseases. the measure will also create a system that rewards efficiency and defectiveness to the benefit of all persons with rare diseases. the modern cures act will encourage the development of drugs abandoned in the development process. it will create a new category of drugs known as dormant therapies for compounds with insufficient patent protections, drugs that offer the promise to treat conditions with unmet medical needs. updating regulatory networks, such as patent reform, will help open the pipeline for new innovations and therapies. patients with degener
of energy based on the idea that we could see sanctions on russia. obviously, we're waiting today for further news on just what action the west is going to take. but right now, we're seeing brent and u.s. crude higher in trade this morning. the dow is down around 0.8%. we've got dollar/ruble trading at five-year highs. i mentioned those actionses and the potential oil impact, gas impact. gazprom one of the key losers for the russian market. we've got a broader impact as far as the russian markets are concerned than what we're seeing in poland, as well. so the real dominating factor is the ukraine. thousands of russian troops are focused in the crimea region following a dramatic weekend in the ukraine. this is a declaration of war by vladimir putin. u.s. secretary of state john kerry condemning russia's actions and will travel to kiev tomorrow for talks with the new ukrainian government. >> president putin is using force in a completely inappropriate manner. fears he's going to lose on the international stage. russia is going to lose. >> steve, it's the one possible benefit of seei
with russia's politically motivated trade practices, whether it's manipulating the energy supply or banning the -- in ukraine. the fact is this is the 21st century, and we should not see nations step backwards to behave in 19th or 20th century fashion. there are ways to resolve these distances. great nations choose to do that appropriately. the fact is that we believe that there are a set of options available to russia and to all of us that could move us down a road for appropriate diplomacy and appropriate diplomatic engagement. and we invite russia to come to that table and particularly, we invite russia directly with the government of ukraine to work through these issues in a thoughtful way. i'm very proud to be here in ukraine. like so many americans and other people around the world, we have watched with extraordinary awe the power of individuals, unarmed, except with ideas, principles and values, who have reached for freedom, for equality, for opportunity. there's nothing more important in this world. that is what drives change in so many parts of the world today. it's really partly w
and they describe the epa policy is one step by 1,000 permits. in general we have too much subsidization of energy whether windmills or companies like solyndra we don't take advantage of free could or should of our natural resources. but the giant shining example of regulatory overkill in my mind is obamacare. it is fundamentally flawed based on the notion in part of the payment system loaded with disincentives to work to implant and very problematic. if you take the combination of the regulatory avalanching and the policy i ask myself is a wonder the economy has grown at all. even at 2 percent we should be impressed considering what the economy is up against. now that i have so blatant your tuesday morning. [laughter] it is encouraging that despite all that we have done this economy manages to eke out some growth it shows an amazing resilience that is in the american dna and in our nature for all the headwinds, that is why i think if we could get policy , economic growth would be amazing. we could be poised to have a terrific break out in growth and prosperity if we would get fundamentals right.
the united states was sending voluntary contributions to the international atomic energy administration, whose voluntary contributions above membership dues were going to create capacity of the nuclear facility not in the national interest of the united states not in the national interest of the state of israel. for a decade i was told my concerns had no legitimate basis , that iran would never be able to bring the plant online and that iran's nuclear activities were not a major concern. history has shown us those assessments about iran's abilities and intentions were civilly wrong man -- wrong man and i believe they are wrong today. i am skeptical of iran keeping its promises. and what we should expect before we moved to an agreement that we would hope permanently dismantles iran's to clear weapon program. i support a diplomatic row gram to get us to a deal. this must be reinforced by international commitment to international regime -- to sanctions against iran. we must keep the pressure on. we cannot let them opt you skate -- obvious gate -- obfuscate to make sure they never have the
is in the top 50, i think. the larger point is energy and sitting on a bunch of oil is not where the action is. there is action obviously in tech. there are more new retail billionaires than tech. 35 retail billionaires. the business of buying things is still very good. >> mark zuckerberg last year worth $13.3 billion and this year $28.5. >> nobody in the world made more money in the past 12 months than mark zuckerberg. >> he is 29, everybody. incredible. randall, a great issue. thanks so much. "forbes" billionaire's list is out now. >>> david remnick was the bureau chief for "the post" in washington in moscow and he joins us with his thoughts on ukraine straight ahead. take a closer look at your fidelity green line and you'll see just how much it has to offer, especially if you're thinking of moving an old 401(k) to a fidelity ira. it gives you a wide range of investment options... and the free help you need to make sure your investments fit your goals -- and what you're really investing for. tap into the full power of your fidelity green line. call today and we'll make it easy to move that o
, its ties to russia, the transport hub, so much of russian energy supplies into urine. it is incredibly important where it is and the gas and oil that runs through it. this is what's so precarious about this ratcheting up of concerns. there is that map we made for you. >> it is literally the pipeline to the west. all that gas from russia goes right through ukraine. >> you look at russian companies. right now, the russian companies that are russian but they trade on the new york stock exchange, the nasdaq. russian oil companies losing 6%, 7%. an exchange traded fund, the rsx, that tracks russia, down big. russian stocks hammered, 13%. the ruble, tumbling. a record low to the euro and the dollar. the central bank of russia came in and jacked up interest rates to try to buffer and help its economy with all of these head winds. >> this matters not just to americans and their 401(k)s but it will matter diplomatically as well. these are the levers that u.s. negotiators can pull. >> if the sabre rattling continues, that urt hads markets for the week. >> we are covering the crisis in the ukrain
, angela merkel of germany said she wasn't keen on the idea. a lot of energy flows from russia and through russia into western europe, to ukraine and other places as well. it will be a test of the president to see, you know, whether he can rally the international community, as he's fond of calling it, to actions that will matter to vladimir putin. >> to all the talk of feckless international policy and the inability to do anything about this and they're not looking at military options, there are still levers this administration can pull, as you mentioned, the g-8, other economic levers, freezing bank account, that could have a significant impact. >> yeah, john kerry was even talking about some of them. these things matter. look, we saw the country, even as isolated a country as iran was crippled by sanctions. i'm not saying that we're capable of doing the same thing with russia, but it is an example of what these kinds of financial sanctions can do. they can make people within the country feel it, and the country as a whole feel it. russia's economy is not great. and it needs trade with na
through this very difficult period and buy energy supplies into the country. also, expertise being given by the u.s. to the finance ministry and central bank to plan their economy a little bit better. what's happening now is that john kerry is speaking with members of the interim ukrainian government to talk about what concrete steps the united states and others in the international community can take to help them out in this difficult position, to try and put pressure on the russians and get them through this very tight financial squeeze that they are going to be in over the coming weeks and months. >> matthew chance in kiev. we are waiting for secretary of state, john kerry. he will hold a news conference there in about 30 minutes. we will get that live. i want to go to christiane amanpour. let's talk about president vladmir putin. he said that the current government in ukraine is illegitimate and russia reserves the right to use more force in ukraine if he wants to. those are strong words. amidst all that, you detected if not conciliation, at least reason to hope that the situation wi
the energy pace for the -- energy base for the navy. how is that a going? and, again, how do you manage that? >> well, first, it's going very well. i said in answer to the first question that it's fuel and energy is a military vulnerability particularly the way we're doing it today. i'm very glad that america's producing more oil and gas. but even if we produce all that we can use, there are two pretty overriding factors. number one, oil and gas are global commodities. and the price is set globally. so you get some instability somewhere, you get somebody threatening to close a strait somewhere, you get anything, when the syrian crisis started, the price of oil went up $10 a barrel. syria's not a major producer, but it's a security premium that traders place on oil regardless of where it's coming from. every time the price of oil goes up a dollar a barrel, it costs the navy and marine corps $30 million in additional fuel costs. in '11 and '12, i was presented with, the navy was presented with an additional unbudgeted $2 billion in fuel costs. well, there are not many places to go get that sor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)